Günter Bialas

1907

Born in Bielschowitz, Upper Silesia, on 19 July

1922-1925

Studied piano and music theory with Fritz Lubrich in Kattowitz

1926-1928

Studied musicology and German language and literate in Breslau

1928-1931

Studied music education in Berlin, then composition in Max Trapp’s master class at the Berlin Academy of the Arts
Member of “Kreis der Zwölf”, a group of composers led by Fritz Jöde

1933

Music teacher in Breslau

1939-1941

Lecturer in music theory at the Institute of Music Education, Breslau University

1945

Moved to Munich and Glonn, Upper Bavaria

1946

Choir director of the Munich Bach Society

1947

Theory teacher at the Weimar Musikhochschule;
composition teacher at Northwest German Music Academy in Detmold                 

1950

Professorship

1954

First prize in music from state of North Rhine-Westphalia

1959

Professorship in composition at the Munich Musikhochschule

1962

Munich Music Award

1964

Johann Wenzel Stamitz Award from Esslingen Artists’ Guild

1967

Music award from the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts

1969

Member of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts

1971

Premier award from the Upper Silesian Cultural Award Committee

1975

Member of the Berlin Academy of the Arts

1980

Silesian Art Award from state of Lower Saxony

1982

Gold Medal München leuchtet” from city of Munich

1987

Cultural prize from city of Munich

1988

Paul Hindemith Award from Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival

1989

Cultural prize from Bavarian State Foundation

1992

Kultur aktuell” Prize 

1992

Gold medallion from city of Munich

1995

died on 8 July in Glonn/Upper Bavaria.

› To top ‹

 

“Whether the music I write is simple or complex depends entirely on what I want to express. Simplicity must be permissible even today: it has just become more difficult to attain since we stumble all too quickly upon depleted material. I have become more sensitive to extraneous notes. The content of my work is purely musical in nature, and I want to project it as openly as possible - not disguised, not encrypted, not hidden behind an excess of artifice. I want to express myself clearly and not try to say many things at once. I would be happiest if I could reduce the compositional pro-cess, as Verdi did, to 'melody and accompaniment'...
A selection of pitches seems to me to give greater character and variety than the continuous presence of all twelve. Much the same can be said of rhythm: when it becomes too complex, it cancels itself out... My music cannot get along without large-scale tonal relations.”

     Günter Bialas (1993) 

More information

Foto: Bärenreiter-Archiv